Basic Lessons on Hindu Dharma
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  Basic Lessons on Hindu Dharma ~ Level - 1  
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Chapter - 3:
A Basic Study of the Six Dharsanas
 
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HR103 - 02
Teachings of the Six Dharsanas explaining the Principles of Vedas
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Lesson: 3-02
The Message and the Philosophy of the Dharsanas
Message of the Vedas as seen by various Sages of different Schools
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Different Sages of various schools gave their insight into diffrent aspects of the Message
 
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The Six Dharsanas are the different approaches to the Vedic teachings of Hindu philosophy. The main aim of Hindu philosophy is to search for the answers to the eternal questions. "Where did we all come from and where are we going?" "Is there a superior force directing all this?" "What is the reason for disease, suffering, old age and death?" "How do we get liberation from all our pains and how do we get Eternal bliss?" We can notice the slow evolution of the thoughts in the six Dharsanas. Whereas Vaiseshika, Sankhya and Vedantha give us the theoretical parts of the philosophy, Nyaya, Yoga and Mimamsa give us the applied and practical side of the faith.

The Nyaya-Vaiseshika Schools give us the Arambha-Vaada. At the beginning of each Kalpa, large numbers of atoms and molecules unite to form different objects with different qualities. This may be under the will of God and destiny of the souls. In this theory, the cause remains different from the effect.

Nyaaya and Vaiseshika are the analytical types of Philosophy and are very similar in their approach. They arrange all the things in the world into categories or padaarthas. They explain how God has made all these worlds from atoms and molecules. They show the way to attain true knowledge of God. This world has begun by a combination of atoms. It has samyoga (conjunction) and viyoga (disassociation). The cause of this world is the paramanus (atoms) and the nine dravyas (materials), including Isvara (God). Both systems agree in their essential principles of Self and the atomic theory of Universe. Jiva is the doer and enjoyer with several attributes.

The Sankhya-Yoga schools improve on it by Parinama- Vaada, to postulate all objects and actions into two ultimate realities, in its theory of evolution. One is Purusha, which is the conscious and active, and the other is the Pradhana or Prakrithi, which is unconscious and dormant. In this, the effect is inherent in the cause.

Finally, we see the Vivartha-Vaada in Vedhantha as a theory of appearance and reality. Here the system has evolved into one of absolute monism, with the unity of individual and the Divine Soul, the Jivaathma and paramaathma.

 
 

 

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Lessons: - :~: 3-01 :~: 3-02 :~: 3-03 :~: 3-04 :~: 3-05 :~: 3-06 :~: 3-07 :~: 3-08 :~:
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