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Special Articles on Hindu Dharma ~ Level - 3 ~
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Realization of Supreme through Concentration of the Mind
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Chapter - 7
True Spiritual Discipline through Meditation
HR 322 - 07
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Lesson 07.11:
Stabilizing the Mind through Dhyãna or Meditation
For Next Lesson
Please See Below
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Dhyana is meditation or an unceasing flow of ideas concentrated on one object. Concentration of any subject in full force is the next step. It leads to success in any walk of life, scientific or spiritual pursuit. It is the only key to open the treasure house of knowledge. It is the power with which the exploration of the super-conscious state is achieved. It takes a long time of regular practice. Real Yoga starts from concentration. Concentration merges into meditation. Meditation ends in Samadhi.

In Samadhi all thought waves subside and mind ceases functioning. Brahmacharya, a congenial place, a company of learned persons, Sattvic food and proper personal habits are auxiliaries for meditation. Swami Sivananda explains some easy steps for meditation and reaching the state of Samadhi. "Sleep, tossing of mind, attachment to objects, subtle desires and cravings, laziness, lack of Brahmacharya, and gluttony are all obstacles in meditation. Vairagya thins out the mind. We should not use any violent efforts at concentration.

When the mind is tired, we should not try to force ourselves to concentrate or try to meditate. If evil thoughts enter the mind, we should not use our will power or force in driving them. We must remain as a witness of those thoughts. They will pass away. We should never miss a day in meditation. Regularity is of paramount importance. We must start with a short period of time every day and gradually increase that.

Initially concentration is difficult and one may go in and out of the meditation with strange thoughts disturbing us but that will improve. The mind passes into many conditions or states as it is made up of three qualities: Sattva, Rajas and Tamas. Kshipta (wandering), Vikshipta (gathering), Mudha (ignorant), Ekagra (one-pointed), and Nirodha (contrary) are the five states of the mind. By controlling the thoughts with intense meditation the Sadhaka may attains great Siddhis.

The powers of Siddhis are great temptations. They will bring about your downfall. A Raja Yogi practices Samyama or the combined practice of Dharana, Dhyana and Samadhi at the same time. We must control the mind by Abhyasa (practice) and Vairagya (dispassion). Any practice that steadies the mind and makes it one-pointed is Abhyasa. We must have Para Vairagya or Theevra Vairagya, intense dispassion." - Swami Sivananda from Amrita Gita.

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Lesson 07.12:
The State of Ultimate realization of truth in Samadhi
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Raja Yoga is a Spiritual discipline for conditioning the Body and Mind to elevate the Spirit. Concentration and meditation will lead to Samadhi or Super-conscious experience. It has several stages of ascent, which are deliberation [Vitarka], analysis [Vichara], joy [Anandha], and self-awareness [Asmita]. Ultimately, the Yogi is freed from births and deaths and he attains Supreme Independence, Kaivalya or final liberation. However, some Siddhis or supernormal powers manifest as Yogic practice advances. The Yogi should shun away from these and march forward to his goal of Nirvikalpa Samadhi or the final liberation. [Swami Sivananda].

We may ask, if for true Spiritual Realization, is Raja yoga with meditation and concentration the only available path. It is not absolutely necessary. In karma yoga whether we do the Vedic rituals or service to others and in bhakti yoga when we do a prayer service and worship God in the several forms, if we concentrate and do our service well without looking for the outcome or fruits, that is like meditation and that will lead to the real Samadhi also.

When the whole of the mind has become one wave and one-pointed and concentrate on one-form, it is called Samadhi. If the mind can be fixed on the center for short periods of time it will be a Dharana. When we are able to successfully concentrate for longer time it will be a Dhyana or meditation. When we ultimately control the mind by prolonged Dhyana it will be a Samadhi.

This is Concentration of the Mind leading to a Super-conscious State. Samadhi is a state of evenness of the mind with a clear vision of the Truth and a state that is ready to receive the true wisdom or Jnaana. Meditation removes obstacles in Sadhana and helps to attain Samadhi. Avidya (ignorance), Asmita (egoism), Raga-Dvesha (likes and dislikes), Abhinivesha (clinging to mundane life) are the five Kleshas or afflictions.

When we destroy these we will attain Samadhi. Samadhi is of two kinds: [1] Savikalpa, Samprajnata or Sabija; and [2] Nirvikalpa, Asamprajnata or Nirbija. In Savikalpa or Sabija, there is Triputi or the triad (knower, known and knowledge). In Nirvikalpa Samadhi, (also called Nirbija Samadhi or Asamprajnata Samadhi) there is no triad. Sage Patañjali says that with Dhyana and Samadhi the soul reaches its end in liberation and enlightenment referred to as Kaivalya which is the ultimate goal of yoga, and it means solitariness or detachment.

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: Lessons : -: 7.01 : - : 7.03 : - : 7.05 : - : 7.07 : - : 7.09 : - : 7.11 :
A Collection of Lessons on Hindu Dharma discussed in Satsangh
There are Two Lessons on each page - so thay you can read two lessons each day.
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